How To Weld

4 August 2009

learn How to Weld Like A Pro
Learning how to weld can be a complex process or not so complex. The final outcome being due to the metals or alloys to be welded and the processes that are used. The basic principle for welding metal or alloy is however the same. Its heating the material to a temperature that allows the metals to be fused together this creating a bond.

Every type of metal or alloy has different characteristics and requires the correct procedures on how to weld them. Metals can be separated into two categories, being non ferrous and ferrous. Non ferrous metals are the alloys such as aluminum, where as ferrous metals contain various amounts of iron. These include stainless steel, cast iron and mild steel. Each metal type requires different welding procedures and filler metals. These proceedures can be broken down into several different categories being, mig welding, arc welding, tig welding and gas welding.

Mig Welding is generally the most used method for industry and home use along side electric Arc welding. Learning how to weld using these methods is mostly for the welding of mild steel. Tig welding is a more specialized process and requires more in depth training. In order to learn to weld using a Tig welder a higher skill level is needed to master the art.

Gas welding is not used as much for the welding of mild steel however is still widely practiced in certain industries as refrigeration and plumbing, for welding copper pipework.
The basic process for how to weld requires that the metal parts to be welded are heated by means of an electric arc or heat from a gas welding torch. Once the metal is heated to melting point the two parts to be welded are then fused together with r without the aid of a filler material.  With mig welding and arc welding the filler material is part of the welding electrode. For gas and tig welding the filler metal is hand fed to the weld as the metals are being heated by the gas heat or as in tig welding, by a tungsten electrode.

how to weld

how to weld

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print this article!
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • BlinkList
  • Blogosphere News
  • Diigo
  • Fark
  • Faves
  • IndianPad
  • LinkaGoGo
  • LinkedIn
  • MisterWong
  • MySpace
  • Propeller
  • Reddit
  • Socialogs
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Tumblr
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks

I am planning on replacing my 12 inch exhaust tips with some 16 inch..
How much will it cost to remove the 12 inch and weld in the 16 inch.?

I already have the 16 inch tips so I am looking for the price of labor only.

Thank you

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print this article!
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • BlinkList
  • Blogosphere News
  • Diigo
  • Fark
  • Faves
  • IndianPad
  • LinkaGoGo
  • LinkedIn
  • MisterWong
  • MySpace
  • Propeller
  • Reddit
  • Socialogs
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Tumblr
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
 | Posted by | Categories: How To Weld | Tagged: , |

Radiator support dented need to use zip disk to cut of and re-weld new support to frame. What type of weld is needed or recommended?

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print this article!
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • BlinkList
  • Blogosphere News
  • Diigo
  • Fark
  • Faves
  • IndianPad
  • LinkaGoGo
  • LinkedIn
  • MisterWong
  • MySpace
  • Propeller
  • Reddit
  • Socialogs
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Tumblr
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
 | Posted by | Categories: How To Weld | Tagged: , , |

If it is, how can we do it? We’ve left it sitting in the pit in the fire for about 45 minutes and we need to know how to weld it. I don’t know what type of metal it is or the make of the shaft.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print this article!
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • BlinkList
  • Blogosphere News
  • Diigo
  • Fark
  • Faves
  • IndianPad
  • LinkaGoGo
  • LinkedIn
  • MisterWong
  • MySpace
  • Propeller
  • Reddit
  • Socialogs
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Tumblr
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
 | Posted by | Categories: How To Weld | Tagged: |

a joint on a lay-z-boy recliner snapped reciently. i’m wondering how, if it’s even possible, to repair it without knowing how to weld and have the repair last through the jostling of sitting in the recliner.
the area snapped used to be connected in a horizontal T-shape. the forward/backward piece snapped off the left/right piece. the chair can still be sat in, but it tilts slightly to the rear left.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print this article!
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • BlinkList
  • Blogosphere News
  • Diigo
  • Fark
  • Faves
  • IndianPad
  • LinkaGoGo
  • LinkedIn
  • MisterWong
  • MySpace
  • Propeller
  • Reddit
  • Socialogs
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Tumblr
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
 | Posted by | Categories: How To Weld | Tagged: , , , |